WHAT TO DO WITH KITCHEN SCRAPS? BONE BROTH!

Don’t be wasteful with those cut up vegetable ends and remaining deboned chicken! Throw it in a pot to make this easy bone broth recipe by nutrition Expert Kaleigh McMordie.

We can all do a little more to make our kitchens greener, so what better way to do than a homemade slow cooker bone broth made with leftover kitchen scraps!

It’s the perfect way to use up all of those “butts” of vegetables, chicken carcasses (in case you have a few lying around) and other kitchen scraps that you would probably throw away normally.

It helps us do our part to reduce food waste just a little bit, plus it’s an inexpensive and healthy alternative to store-bought broths that can be filled with sodium!

Before we get into the recipe, let’s talk about broth.

Apparently bone broth is the new ‘it’ thing. Although technically, it’s been around forever. And if you are a part of the online health and wellness community at all, you’ve probably seen at least one article touting the multiple health benefits of bone broth.

If you haven’t, here are a few common ones:

Detox, gut healing, relieves arthritis, youthful skin, energy boosting, sleep better, immune support, improves your memory.

It’s like every online health claim combined into one.  

Basically, here’s the deal people. No one food is a cure-all, and all of these claims certainly are not true. There is no scientific evidence that bone broth can do any of these things. Well, there is one backed claim, and that is chicken broth (or any other hot liquid) can help decrease upper respiratory symptoms by loosening and clearing out mucus more effectively. All health claims aside, bone broth still contains plenty of nutrients and is a kitchen staple that can be used in a million and one recipes. So it’s good to have around, and it is even better if you make it yourself.

You don’t have to use kitchen scraps, either. By all means, use the whole carrot if you want. I just happen to collect a lot of scraps for the particular purpose of making broth, and I’m trying to reduce food waste. The obvious ingredients are spare bones plus onion, carrot, and celery ends, but you can also use herb stems, leek or green onion ends, and even the rind of hard cheeses, such as parmesan. My aunt taught me that one, and it makes the broth extra rich.

Making the slow cooker bone broth is very simple, and if your bones aren’t cooked already, roast them for about 30 minutes first to bring out the flavor.

Simply bundle all of your scraps into a cheesecloth, add to a slow cooker with a few tablespoons of apple cider vinegar, fill to the top with water, and simmer on low all day long. When it’s done, simply toss the scrap bundle, skim the fat (if you want), and pour into containers to use whenever you’d like! If you just want vegetable broth, you are more than welcome to omit the bones and optional cheese rind. It will keep for about 2 weeks in the fridge.

If you’ve never made broth before give this a try! It’s an economical and delicious way to reduce food waste in your kitchen and have a healthier homemade staple right there in your refrigerator.

INGREDIENTS
  • Chicken or beef bones, cooked (omit for vegetable broth)
  • Any vegetable scraps such as onion, celery, and carrot
  • Herb stems (cilantro, parsley, thyme, etc)
  • 2 cloves garlic, smashed
  • 1/2 tsp peppercorns
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 cheese rind (optional)
  • 2-4 tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • Water
Visit here for the full recipe and instructions.
HEADER IMAGE: DOMINIK MARTIN

Kaleigh McMordie, MCN, RDN is a Texas-based Registered Dietitian and food enthusiast who shares delicious recipes for those who seek a healthy, vibrant life. By focusing on nourishment without giving up the joy of good food, Kaleigh helps others attain a balanced, wholesome approach to life that brings people together. Learn more about Kaleigh and visit her at Lively Table.

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