Seek the Truth

Many of us in the U.S. are fortunate enough to have access to a variety of nourishing foods to help us maintain a healthy lifestyle.

Despite the luxury of this access, it’s ironic that our society as a whole tends to seek out polarizing trends that go against the fundamentals of healthy eating.  

Decades of studies show that an established consensus exists: a balanced, nutrient-rich diet is the key to good health. However, the latest fads and diet trends almost always lean towards either the overconsumption or elimination of specific foods.  

How is that balanced at all? And why do we complicate matters when, in fact, it all comes down to our most basic need to nourish ourselves?

Let’s call it for what it is: first world problems in a society which often forgets how privileged we are relative to those who are underserved either here in our country, and in other parts of the world.

In developing countries, cereal grains are a cheap staple food that feeds millions of people around the world…yet we insist on branding gluten-free as the only ‘healthy’ option when it’s necessary for a limited number of people. Fresh fruits and vegetables are a luxury that many in this world cannot even afford, but we choose to strip it down for the sake of a cold-pressed juice.

Soy is avoided because of its perceived estrogen effects on man boobs and breast cancer, even though it’s proven to be linked to health and longevity in Asian diets for centuries. And the egg and heart disease myth perpetuated since the 1950s is still a common misconception; in reality, eggs provide highly quality protein to the lowest income families.

Eating to live is the common thread that ties us all together, no matter where we are in the world.  It is time we recognize that the act of nourishing ourselves must be done with a socially-conscious mind on how our food is accessed and obtained…so that we may remain grateful for the privileges we have.

Let’s find out what it means to be truthful to yourself with Expert Mascha Davis:

Grains
Fruits and Veggies
Eggs
Soy